Library news

CERN library event

With the availability of new massive digital collections, innovative ways of exploring library data are emerging. Researchers are starting to investigate the use of powerful analysis tools that go beyond what the human eye can see, beyond what the human mind can process. Text and data mining techniques offer new opportunities for new types of research. Since a few years now, the BnF has seen its digital collections driving the interests of the early-adopters of new data management tools. These digital studies may be at the core of our users’ practice in the future; they may become instrumental in defining what a national library is. That’s why in 2016, the BnF started within its 4-year internal research programme a new project called CORPUS, aimed at designing a future service for providing access to digital corpora for researchers.

Emmanuelle Bermès is deputy director for services and networks at BnF since 2014. From 2003 to 2011, she worked at the National library of France (BnF), first in digital libraries and digital preservation, then in metadata management. From 2011 to 2014, she was in charge of multimedia and digital services at the Centre Pompidou (Paris, France). She has held a number of responsibilities at international level:  within Europeana, the W3C, IFLA and the International internet preservation consortium. Among other charges, she is the coordinator for the Corpus project within the BnF.

 

 

Archival historical image

Wolfgang Pauli received his habilitation from the University of Hamburg in 1924  – the same year he discovered his Nobel-Prize-winning exclusion principle – and delivered his inaugural lecture on 23 February. He was awarded the title of professor in 1926, then obtained a professorship in theoretical physics at the ETH, Zürich, in 1928. His tendency to forget about the audience, and think out problems as he went along, proved challenging for some students. But, as Markus Fierz pointed, they at least learned to think critically about a theory!

CERN Courier Bookshelf
January 2018
Library news

CERN Authoring is excited to announce that all CERN members now enjoy full access to the services offered by Overleaf and ShareLaTeX!

Both platforms focus on scientific collaborative authoring: Overleaf is an online LaTeX and Rich Text collaborative editor and publishing tool and ShareLaTeX is an online LaTeX collaborative editor and reviewing tool. Their rich feature set includes: pure LaTeX editor, rich text editor (Overleaf only), real-time collaboration, real-time PDF preview, author comments, track changes (ShareLaTeX only), version control (w/ Git access) and export as PDF & LaTeX.

Overleaf and ShareLaTeX are joining forces, bringing their teams and services together as they continue to build great tools for collaborative authoring. Over the coming months, they will be working on merging Overleaf and ShareLaTeX together into a single service while making the transition as smooth as possible.

Please visit https://cern.ch/authoring  for more information on how to use Overleaf and ShareLaTeX and claim your CERN account.

Archival historical image

Future Nobel laureate Wolfgang Pauli was a little over six-and-a-half years old when this photo was taken in December 1906. His biographer Charles Enz notes that that young Wolfi contracted all the usual childhood diseases and, to use the typically Viennese expression, es war ihm immer fad – he always felt bored.

 

By the age of four he was already adept in the art of contradicting his elders that would later help him to reshape modern physics. On being told during one of his walks through Vienna, ‘Now we are walking over the Danube Canal', he replied firmly, ‘No, Aunt Erna, this is the Wien Canal, which flows into the Danube Canal.’

Library news

Publishers and information providers are progressively strengthening authentication on their servers by introducing secure http. And as you have noticed, the current system doesn’t work anymore for some resources such as APS Journals.

There is therefore a new authentication procedure to access online resources made available by the Library from outside CERN. As a consequence, from now on, URLs of online resources (=articles, ebooks, databases) made available by the Library must, for remote access, be prefixed by: https://ezproxy.cern.ch/login?url=

URLs of resources listed on the CERN Document Server or on the Library web site are currently being modified to make sure the prefix is automatically added.

If you access the online resources listed above directly from a Google search or any other web site, you must add the prefix: https://ezproxy.cern.ch/login?url= to the url of the resource.

As an example, to access this article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900217310045

You need to modify the url as follows: https://ezproxy.cern.ch/login?url=https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900217310045

To simplify access, we advise you to install a bookmarklet (working on all browsers: Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Internet Explorer - javascript must be enabled). All instructions on how to install this Bookmarklet are available on this page

Please note that:

  • Inside CERN, the access works as usual.
  • This service works for CERN Computer account only.
  • The access will only work if the CERN Library has a subscription to the resource. Please check the availability on the CERN document server or on the Library resources webpage
  • No authentification is needed for Open Access resources
  • The current Proxy system remains active for the time being, but is not maintained anymore.

In case of any problem or to provide feedback, please contact: library.desk@cern.ch.

CERN Courier Bookshelf
December 2017
Archival historical image

Chief engineer Bernard Poulten received this drawing from his colleagues at CERN’s Isotope Separator On-Line DEvice fifty-one years ago. In deference to the well-known legend and opera, it was inscribed ‘To Tristan from Isolde (project), 3.11.1966’. (You can see the full drawing here.) Clearing out some old papers recently, he and his family very kindly decided to send the drawing back to CERN… where it arrived just in time for ISOLDE’s anniversary celebrations!

 

ISOLDE, CERN’s longest-running experimental facility, produced its first radioactive beam 50 years ago. Past and present staff tell the story, with the help of some early film clips here.

CERN Courier Bookshelf
November 2017
Archival historical image

On 10 October 1964 representatives of CERN’s Member States came to see for themselves the progress made during the laboratory’s first decade and to hear about plans for the future. On 30 October Director-General Victor Weisskopf invited all staff for a glass of wine to celebrate, and declared 2 November an official holiday.

 

You can read the official speeches here, or you can read R. W. Penney’s ‘unscientific recollections’ in the CERN Courier.  Penney preferred speak of an eleventh anniversary, since he said CERN really took off in September 1953, when the various groups began to centralise in Geneva. The Meyrin site was still a ploughed field, so they worked where they could; he summed up life in the early days as ‘exhilarating’ and ‘exhausting’.

Pages

Subscribe to Library news

You are here