Library news

CERN library event

Edward Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Editor-in-Chief, presents Physics, an international peer-reviewed open access journal which presents latest researches on all aspects of physics. It publishes original research articles, review articles, communications and short notes with no restriction on the length of the papers. Physics is published quarterly online by MDPI.

 

 

                        

CERN library event
Archival historical image
September 1984 – CERN’s 30th anniversary

This photo shows one of the 4,500 visitors at CERN’s Open Day on 15 September 1984. The festivities, which marked the Organization’s 30th anniversary, also included a concert and a formal ceremony on 21 September.  CERN’s team of historians put together an exhibition of archival documents, and a history seminar traced over three decades of achievement. Read all about the events in the November 1984 CERN Courier, or browse through the exhibition catalogue and official speeches here .

Library news

We are considering a future redesign of our premises. Our objective is to offer more ergonomic workspaces, adapted to the needs of our users.

That is why we are conducting a survey. From August 20th to September 6th 2019, please complete the online questionnaire: http://cern.ch/go/6LL9

Since early summer, our team has been considering the question: how do we improve the physical spaces of the library? We have reviewed state-of-the-art libraries and started collecting your opinions through a brainstorming wall and interviews within the library. 

Now we would like even more points of view on, for instance, the furniture that would suit you best, the electrical outlets you need or even how brightly lit the room should be.

The survey will not take you more than 10 minutes. Whether you are a regular user or only come to the Library occasionally, we are interested in your opinion.

The answers to the questionnaire are of course anonymous and confidential. We will not collect your personal data.

If you have any questions, please contact us at this address: library.desk@cern.ch.

Thank you in advance for your participation !

Library news

We are considering a future redesign of our premises. Our objective is to offer more ergonomic workspaces, adapted to the needs of our users.

That is why we are conducting a survey. From August 20th to September 6th 2019, please complete the online questionnaire: http://cern.ch/go/6LL9

Since early summer, our team has been considering the question: how do we improve the physical spaces of the library? We have reviewed state-of-the-art libraries and started collecting your opinions through a brainstorming wall and interviews within the library. 

Now we would like even more points of view on, for instance, the furniture that would suit you best, the electrical outlets you need or even how brightly lit the room should be.

The survey will not take you more than 10 minutes. Whether you are a regular user or only come to the Library occasionally, we are interested in your opinion.

The answers to the questionnaire are of course anonymous and confidential. We will not collect your personal data.

If you have any questions, please contact us at this address: library.desk@cern.ch.

Thank you in advance for your participation !

Archival historical image
August 1987 – “Cosmic Song” by Serge Moro

In 1985 CERN commissioned a monumental mosaic for its new reception building, Serge Moro’s “Cosmic Song”, which was completed in 1987. This photo shows the scale of the artwork, and a more dramatic picture of the swirling colours and shapes was captured by the July/August CERN Courier (p. 31).

 

The metal and plexiglass flooring, built in collaboration with the CERN workshops, uses fluorescent light effects governed by the constant rain of cosmic ray particles from outer space. You can see it in action in the artist’s film clip.

Archival historical image
July 1960 – Soviet visitors arrive at CERN

Following CERN’s decision in 1959 to welcome Soviet scientists, the first long-term visitors from beyond the iron curtain arrived on 18 July 1960 for a stay of six months.

 

Vladimir Meshcheryakov and Rostislav Ryndin, from the Theoretical Physics Laboratory in Dubna, joined CERN’s Theoretical Studies Division, where they continued to work on projects begun in the USSR, while experimentalist Yuri Sherbakov, also from Dubna, assisted in running the 600 MeV synchro-cyclotron. See the July 1960 CERN Courier  for more details.

Archival historical image
May 1971 – Inauguration of Gargamelle

CERN’s Gargamelle bubble chamber was inaugurated on 7 May 1971. The giantess (named after the mother of Gargantua, in François Rabelais’ The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel) was 4.8 metres long by 2 metres in diameter, and weighed 1,000 tonnes.

 

Almost half a century later, some of the pictures showing the trails of bubbles that allowed scientists to view the tracks of the particles form part of an exhibition showcasing work by CERN’s artists-in-residence.

 

Read more about the Quantum exhibition at the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona  (CCCB) here and more about Arts-at-CERN here You can watch a short film about the design, construction and operation of Gargamelle here and see more Gargamelle bubble chamber pictures, with some of their interpretive sketches, here.

CERN library event

The increasingly digital records of our communities and our organizations require all of us to become digital stewardship and digital preservation practitioners. The challenge seems daunting but the good news is we don’t have to do it alone. A distributed network of practitioners and learners across the globe are increasingly finding ways to learn together and share and pool their resources to tackle these challenges and provide enduring access to our digital heritage. This talk will provide an overview of key principles for practicing digital stewardship and an orientation to how to connect with and engage with the international community of practice developing and refining the craft of digital stewardship and digital preservation.

 

Dr. Trevor Owens is a librarian, researcher, policy maker, and educator working on digital infrastructure for libraries. Owens currently serves as the inaugural Head of Digital Content Management at the Library of Congress. In addition, he teaches graduate seminars in digital history for American University’s History Department and digital preservation for the University of Maryland’s College of Information, where he is also a Research Affiliate with the Digital Curation Innovation Center.

 

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