Library news

Archival historical image

The 8th Annual International Conference on High Energy Physics – known as the Rochester Conference, from the name of its first venue – was held at the Physics Institute of the University of Geneva. The format for this meeting, which was also the 2nd CERN Conference on High Energy Nuclear Physics, differed slightly from previous years. To maximise use of time, rapporteurs were chosen summarise the developments in their field. You can read the proceedings here or look at some of the deliberations of the planning committee here.

 

Even if rapporteurs helped make the content clearer for participants, CERN’s Public Information Office pointed out that it ‘will probably be too hard to digest for the average reporter and reader, even if cleverly "popularized". Thus the main stress should be placed on personalities and the spirit of international cooperation.’ (See memo.) There were plenty of high profile physicists to choose from, including Nobel Prize winner Wolfgang Pauli; a rare recording of him speaking at the conference is online here.   

Library news

As from the 1st of August 2017, the subscription to ASTM COMPASS that gave online access to a selection of ASTM standards won’t be available anymore via the CERN Scientific Information Service.

Please do not hesitate to contact the Library to provide feedback and to get advice on how to obtain ASTM standards for the future. 

CERN Courier Bookshelf
July/August 2017
Library news

Since beginning of July 2017, Web of Science (multidisciplinary bibliographic database, featuring citation searching and metrics of impact) and Journal of Citation Report (source of the Impact Factor) are no longer available via the CERN Scientific Information Service.

In view of the limited budget situation, the Library had to focus on services that are considered critical for the core mission of CERN. The discontinuation of Web of Science leads to considerable savings that will permit continued access for staff and users to the primary literature.

Please do not hesitate to contact the Library (link sends e-mail) to provide feedback and to get advice on information retrieval under the new circumstances.

CERN Courier Bookshelf
June 2017
Archival historical image

CERN has the privilege of housing the scientific archive of 1945 Nobel-prizewinning physicist Wolfgang Pauli. This small but historically valuable collection was donated by Pauli’s widow who, with the help of friends, tracked down originals or copies of his numerous letters. This correspondence, with Bohr, Heisenberg, Einstein and others, provides an invaluable resource on the development of 20th century science.

 

Franca Pauli can be seen here with two of CERN’s founding fathers, Francis Perrin and François de Rose, at the inauguration of CERN’s Pauli Memorial Room (Salle Pauli) on 14 June 1960 (press release, in French). The Archive also includes photographs, manuscripts, notes, and a rare audio recording of Pauli lecturing in 1958. Many items have been digitized and are available online; more information is available here.

CERN library event

Rafelski presents Special Relativity in a language deemed accessible to students without any topical preparation - avoiding the burden of geometry, tensor calculus, and space-time symmetries – and yet advancing in highly contemporary context all the way to research frontiers. Special Relativity is presented such that nothing remains a paradox or just apparent, but rather is explained. A text of similar character, content, and scope, has not been available before. This book describes Special Relativity when rigid material bodies are introduced describing the reality of body contraction; it shows the relevance of acceleration and the necessary evolution of the theoretical framework when acceleration is critical. This book also presents the evolving views of Einstein about the aether. In addition to a careful and elementary introduction to relativity complete with exercises, worked examples and many discussions, this volume connects to current research topics.

"Relativity matters : from Einstein's EMC2 to laser particle acceleration and quark-gluon plasma", by Jan Rafelski,  Springer, 2017, ISBN 9783319512303


                                                     Coffee will be served at 15.30

CERN Courier Bookshelf
May 2017
CERN library event

The abstract will be available soon.

The talk will take place on Monday 12 June at 1600 in the Main Auditorium (Room 500). The talk is part of the series of "Library Science Talks", jointly organized by the Zentralbibliothek Zurich, CERN and the Association of International Librarians and Information Specialists (AILIS).

Archival historical image

On 7 may 1977 Europe inaugurated the world’s largest accelerator – the Super Proton Synchrotron; you can read all about it in the CERN Courier.

 

But what was happening behind the scenes? Did you know that organising secretary, Miss Steel, set up a massive card index to keep track of the guests, entering all the details on 6,000 colour-coded cards? She also insisted on sending reply cards to the VIPs, even though treating them like ordinary mortals was considered infra dig; she said the higher you go in a hierarchy, the less legible signatures become, and she wanted to know who the replies came from. Logistics were further complicated by differing conceptions between the different countries as to what constituted an “official delegate”. Her unofficial report makes interesting reading too.  

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