Library news

Available at the CERN bookshop

Changes and additions to the new edition of this classic textbook include: New chapter on Symmetries, new problems and examples, Improved explanations, more numerical problems to be worked on a computer, new applications to solid state physics, consolidated treatment of time-dependent potentials.

Available at the CERN bookshop
New book

This is your opportunity to take the next step in your career by expanding and validating your skills on the AWS cloud. AWS has been the frontrunner in cloud computing products and services, and the AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide for the Associate exam will get you fully prepared through expert content, and real-world knowledge, key exam essentials, chapter review questions, access to Sybex's interactive online learning environment, and much more. This official study guide, written by AWS experts, covers exam concepts, and provides key review on exam topics, including: * Mapping Multi-Tier Architectures to AWS Services, such as web/app servers, firewalls, caches and load balancers * Understanding managed RDBMS through AWS RDS (MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server, Postgres, Aurora) * Understanding Loose Coupling and Stateless Systems * Comparing Different Consistency Models in AWS Services * Understanding how AWS CloudFront can make your application more cost efficient, faster and secure * Implementing Route tables, Access Control Lists, Firewalls, NAT, and DNS * Applying AWS Security Features along with traditional Information and Application Security * Using Compute, Networking, Storage, and Database AWS services * Architecting Large Scale Distributed Systems * Understanding of Elasticity and Scalability Concepts * Understanding of Network Technologies Relating to AWS * Deploying and Managing Services with tools such as CloudFormation, OpsWorks and Elastic Beanstalk. Learn from the AWS subject-matter experts, review with proven study tools, and apply real-world scenarios. If you are looking to take the AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate exam, this guide is what you need for comprehensive content and robust study tools that will help you gain the edge on exam day and throughout your career.

New book

Measured by the accuracy of its predictions and the scope of its technological applications, quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theories in science--as well as one of the most misunderstood. The deeper meaning of quantum mechanics remains controversial almost a century after its invention. Providing a way past quantum theory's paradoxes and puzzles, QBism offers a strikingly new interpretation that opens up for the nonspecialist reader the profound implications of quantum mechanics for how we understand and interact with the world. Short for Quantum Bayesianism, QBism adapts many of the conventional features of quantum mechanics in light of a revised understanding of probability. Bayesian probability, unlike the standard "frequentist probability," is defined as a numerical measure of the degree of an observer's belief that a future event will occur or that a particular proposition is true. Bayesianism's advantages over frequentist probability are that it is applicable to singular events, its probability estimates can be updated based on acquisition of new information, and it can effortlessly include frequentist results. But perhaps most important, much of the weirdness associated with quantum theory--the idea that an atom can be in two places at once, or that signals can travel faster than the speed of light, or that Schrodinger's cat can be simultaneously dead and alive--dissolves under the lens of QBism. Using straightforward language without equations, Hans Christian von Baeyer clarifies the meaning of quantum mechanics in a commonsense way that suggests a new approach to physics in general.

Archival historical image

The traditional Festschrift was abandoned for Niels Bohr’s 50th birthday, lest he should ‘feel it as his duty to read the contents and even try to learn something.’ Instead, he received the Journal of Jocular Physics.

 

Future Director-General of CERN, Viki Weisskopf, was a major contributor. His ‘Komplementäre Philosophie des Witzes’ (Complementary Philosophy of Jokes) maintained that humour held a curved mirror to truth, giving a distorted but illuminating insight that challenged our comfortable assumptions in much the same way as one of key tenets of quantum mechanics, complementarity.

 

Published by the Institute of Theoretical Physics (now the Niels Bohr Institute), the spoof journal contained articles in German, Danish, English, French and Japanese and espoused an attitude of ‘hopeful pessimism and serene preparedness’. Sadly, with Europe moving towards World War 2, contributions from G. Gamow, O. Klein (echoing a bellicose speech by Mussolini) and L. Rosenfeld were omitted, as ‘the possibility of misinterpretation in a political and therefore, not purely jocular sense could not be entirely excluded.’

Library news

Starting on October 1st, during a 3 months trial, the HR department offers unlimited online access to the Bookboon eLibrary of over 600 titles on a wide-range of topics focusing on personal and professional development. Learn how to present confidently and convincingly, master the art of negotiation or simply improve your time management and communication skills.

You will be able to download the eBooks directly as PDF and read them on any device. Based on viewing statistics and feedback, we will explore how to integrate the offer permanently in our learning offer.

The Bookboon ebooks are available on the CERN Learning hub.

 

CERN Courier Bookshelf
September 2018
Archival historical image

“The formation of the European Physical Society with such a wide membership is a further demonstration of the determination of scientists to collaborate as closely as possible in order to make their positive contribution to the strength of European cultural unity.”

 

So said Gilberto Bernardini in his inaugural address on 26 September 1968. But it all started with a friendly dinner party in Bologna three years earlier; read Bernardini’s 18 January 1966 letter to Leon Van Hove here.

 

More information about the history of EPS here

More about the inauguration ceremony here

This photo shows Bernardini enrolling as a member of EPS; see more photos of the inauguration ceremony here

CERN library event

Libraries own many valuable holdings and collections that have great potential to attract public interest. But how do library customers find out about their existence? In most cases, digitizing and placing them on the internet alone is not enough to achieve the desired access numbers. Marketing is then quickly blamed: Too little was invested, the wrong channels were selected or the images were not attractive enough. So, how can the holdings and collections be marketed successfully?
The presentation discusses how marketing is used as a way of thinking in libraries and focuses on content marketing. Selected real-life examples are given to illustrate how content and collections can be promoted and distributed via various online channels. Topics such as storytelling, video and social media will be addressed.

Deborah Kyburz Deborah Kyburz has been working at ETH Library in Zurich since 2013 and has taken continuous training in social media management and content marketing. In addition to her work as a web and digital media manager, she was in charge of the project Multimedia Storytelling, in context of which the content marketing platform Explora was conceived and implemented. After several years in online marketing, Deborah Kyburz is now heading the group Community & Content Marketing at ETH Library.

 

 

Archival historical image

During the summer of 1962, the CERN Photo Club and Public Information Department organized a photographic competition on the theme, ‘How a visitor sees CERN’.

 

E. Fischer scooped a prize with an excellent colour print of the tall, white Administration building standing out against a clear blue sky. Marinus van Gulik took another approach, and another prize, with a series of photos of his son. You can see some of them in the December 1962 CERN Courier. His pictures also featured the Administration building or, as he called it, CERN’s third machine, the paper accelerator.

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